Tag Archives: We are Social

Twitter’s like Marmite

You either love it or you hate it…but it is addictive.

In this new age of sharing, it has now become our time that limits our sociability. It is only when we go to sleep, or alternatively have no access to either our mobile phones or internet enabled computer (i.e. in my living room unless you are pressed against the window), that we zone out from our social networks. With thousands of followers being followed by thousands more followers, it is no surprise that we can’t keep up with the world outside the front door. Computers really are our window on the world, so much so that we can live every detail of our lives through them, no matter how small and insignificant.

Long live the social blackout of the underground system, that gives us a break from the social abnormality of digital media and let us pray that this doesn’t get compromised for those who already have enough friends but always want more. Are you listening Boris Johnson!

Now check out the video by Stuart Miles from MegaWhatTV…an accurate representation of what we are all thinking…!

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Is it really about telling stories?

Found this little nugget on We are Social taken from Ian Tait’s excellent Crack Unit blog.

Ian Tait’s  full post can be found here, and is well worth the time to sit down and read.

“My suspicion is that we’re seeing adverts made by people who haven’t been collaborating deeply online. Who haven’t been a part of these things. Who don’t understand the subtle, emotional things that happen in online relationships and groups. Another part of the reason we end up with big, generic, broad-brush, advertising. Things that work, in general, for some of the population.

But maybe broadcast media isn’t the place to tell the (more) interesting, deeper stories. The stories that happen quietly, inside the wires, over the airwaves, through the devices and in people’s minds.

Perhaps stories of togetherness and collaboration are best told in places where people are together, collaborating. And perhaps they should be told in ways that reflect the brilliance, excitement and usefulness of what doing things together using tools and technologies – not metaphors – is actually all about.

Or maybe in those places it’s not about telling stories at all.”